OMA Awards
OMA Awards

Founded in 1921, the OMA Awards Program recognizes the work of physicians, residents and medical students in Ontario. Individuals are awarded for outstanding contributions of service to the Ontario Medical Association, the medical profession, medical science or the common good. 

Award recipients are celebrated annually at the OMA awards ceremony, held at the Annual General Meeting in spring, or through local events dependent on the award category.

Call for Nominations 2019 Awards

Submissions due December 31, 2018, 5:00 p.m.

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2019 Award Categories

OMA LIFE MEMBERSHIP
Awarded to members who have made an outstanding contribution to the work of the Association in the interest of the medical profession. In addition to OMA-related involvement, work done to advance medical science and other positive work done at the provincial level can be considered. OMA Life Membership is awarded to members who have reached the age of 65 as of December 31st in the year preceding the annual meeting that the awards are to be presented. Under exceptional circumstances, candidates under 65 years of age may be considered. Nominations may be made by an OMA member, the Executives of a Branch Society, a District or a Section. A maximum of 25 Life Memberships are awarded annually.

OMA HONORARY MEMBERSHIP
Ordinarily awarded to a non-physician for having achieved eminence in science and/or humanities, such as outstanding service to the OMA, the medical profession, medical science or common good at the provincial level. Nominations may be made by an OMA member, the Executives of a Branch Society, a District or a Section. There are never more than 25 Honorary Members at one time.

OMA CENTENNIAL AWARD
Awarded to a non-physician in recognition of outstanding achievements through lengthy service and/or distinguished acts in serving the health and welfare of the people of Ontario. Nominations may be made by an OMA member, the Executives of a Branch Society, a District or a Section. One Centennial Award may be presented annually.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD
Awarded to a member of the Association for exceptional long-standing service to the OMA, with the exclusion of Past-Presidents of the Association. This involves membership on major committees, Council, or the Board. Nominations may be made by any member of the Association. One award may be presented annually.

ADVOCATE FOR STUDENTS AND RESIDENTS AWARD
Awarded to a physician or non-physician in recognition of outstanding contributions that have significantly benefited the medical students or residents of the province of Ontario. Nominations may be made by an OMA member, the Executives of a Branch Society, a District or a Section, or by the deans of the six medical schools in the province. One award may be
presented annually.

PRESIDENTIAL AWARD
Awarded to a member of the Association in recognition of exceptional and long-standing humanitarian service to the greater community (in Ontario or elsewhere) that brings honour to the medical profession. The award recipient, by his or her actions, expresses the highest qualities of service by a physician that we all admire. Nominations may be made by any member of the Association. One award may be presented annually.

GLENN SAWYER SERVICE AWARD
Awarded to OMA members in recognition of significant service to the OMA, medical profession or public at the community level. Nominations may be made through a Branch Society by universities, hospitals and community medical leaders in the area. One nomination from each Branch Society will be accepted. The Glenn Sawyer Service Award may be awarded to any OMA member who has not yet received OMA Life Membership or CMA Honorary Membership. A maximum of 15 awards may be presented annually.

COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD
Awarded to non-physician members of a community for significant contribution to the health and welfare of the people of a local community as defined by involvement in community health and public welfare, including length of involvement, roles fulfilled in local organizations, and personal achievements. Nominations may be made by the nominee’s Branch Society or District Executive. One award per Branch Society may be presented annually.

SECTION SERVICE AWARD
Awarded to OMA members in recognition of significant service to the OMA, medical profession, or public within a Section. Nominations may be made through a Section by universities, hospitals and community medical leaders in the area. One nomination from each Section will be accepted. The Section Service Award may be awarded to any OMA
member who has not yet received OMA Life Membership or CMA Honorary Membership. A maximum of 15 awards may be presented annually.

MEDICAL STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Awarded annually to one student from each of the six provincial medical schools based on significant contributions at the political and/or community level that helps advance the life and/or education of all medical students. Nominations will be accepted directly from medical students. Where necessary, applications may be reviewed by a committee of peers who are elected student representatives of the OMA Section of Medical Students.

RESIDENT ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Awarded annually to one resident from each of the six provincial medical schools for outstanding contribution to the advancement of postgraduate training. Nominations may be made by university professors, teaching faculties, the OMA Section of Interns and Residents, and PARO.

T.C. ROUTLEY CHALLENGE SHIELD
Awarded to the Branch Society which most adequately fulfils its purpose of service to its members, community and profession through programs and activities defined by:
a. contributions by Branch Societies to the OMA as demonstrated by activity in OMA Committees, Council and/or
b. contributions by the Branch Society to science, medical education, culture, hospitals, community service, politics, public welfare and other civic activities. Branch Societies apply through their District Executive with a report outlining their activities.
Only one Shield is awarded annually. Ordinarily, this award would not be presented to a Branch Society more frequently than every 10 years.

2018 Award Winners

Distinguished Service Award
Distinguished Service Award
The Distinguished Service Award is awarded for exceptional long-standing service to the Ontario Medical Association. This involves membership on major committees, Council or the Board.
Dr. Alan Hudak

Dr. Alan Hudak graduated from McMaster University Medical School in 1978 and received his Fellowship in Paediatrics from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in 1982. He received the inaugural Lalia B. Chase Scholarship in Paediatric and Infectious Disease Research at Dalhousie University, completing research in listeriosis and rapid diagnostic tests. In 1983, Dr. Hudak moved to Orillia to establish a consulting practice in paediatrics. He was instrumental in developing a regional paediatric program, creating outreach consulting clinics in the surrounding communities. Additionally, he has provided locum consulting services in hospitals across Northern Ontario (Timmins, Kenora, Thunder Bay and North Bay). He has academic appointments at McMaster University, University of Toronto, and the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) teaching PGY4 residents from the Hospital for Sick Children, and clinical clerks from NOSM and McMaster University. Dr. Hudak has served as Chief of the Department of Paediatrics at Orillia Soldiers Memorial Hospital, as well as President of the Medical Staff and member of the Board of Directors. He has been on the Executive of the Simcoe County District Health Council. He has also served on the Provincial Advisory Committee on Newborn and Childhood Screening, and the Provincial Maternal and Newborn Advisory Committee. Dr. Hudak has been active in the OMA as a member of OMA Council since 1989. He was District 5 Chair before joining the Board of Directors for 10 years. During that time he served on numerous committees, including Chair of the Child Health Committee and Chair of the Regional Consulting Paediatrics AFP Working Group. For the past 10 years, Dr. Hudak has been Chair of OMA Council.

Presidential Award
Presidential Award
The Presidential award is awarded in recognition of exceptional and long-standing humanitarian service to the greater community (in Ontario or elsewhere) that brings honour to the medical profession. The award recipient by his or her actions expresses the highest qualities of service by a physician that we all admire.
Dr. Lynda Redwood-Campbell

Dr. Lynda Redwood-Campbell has research and scholarly interests in global health, immigrant/refugee/humanitarian health. She earned her professional degrees from McMaster University (MD), the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She was elected into the Delta Omega Honorary Society in the United States. Dr. Redwood-Campbell has worked in many low-income countries following tsunamis, earthquakes and outbreaks, including Indonesia, Pakistan, Rwanda, DRC, Kenya, Honduras, Bangladesh, Haiti, the Philippines and Nepal. She has acted as consultant to the WHO, Health Action in Crisis Team, and participated in the initial Cuban meeting to develop the Foreign Medical Team concept that progressed to a more formal method of transparency for foreign medical teams working internationally. Her research has included immigrant woman’s barriers to cervical cancer screening, HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean, post-tsunami survivors’ health and the ethics of humanitarian health care work. Dr. Redwood-Campbell is currently studying how lessons learned with the emergency response teams can be translated to the domestic context. She has over 133 professional presentations, 41 publications and over $1.2M in research grants. She held leadership positions in global health at the Canadian College of Family Physicians, and the Association of Faculties of Medicine, and is the current Co-Chair, Faculty Development Group, Besrour Centre. She continues to partner with the Syiah Kuala University to build capacity in family medicine in Indonesia, and is also an active member of the Canadian Red Cross International Emergency Response team and the Red Cross Field Assessment Coordination team. Dr. Redwood-Campbell has a clinical full-time teaching family medicine practice at McMaster University.

Glenn Sawyer Service Award
Glenn Sawyer Service Award
The Glenn Sawyer Service Award is awarded in recognition of significant service to the OMA, medical profession, or public at the community level.
Dr. Jeffrey Green

Dr. Jeffrey Green is a Family Medicine Doctor in St. Thomas, Ontario.

Dr. Nadine Yammine

Dr. Nadine Yammine specialized in Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery in Chatham, Ontario.

Dr. Pauline Pariser

Dr. Pauline Pariser practices Family Medicine in Toronto, Ontario.

Dr. Vivian Rambihar

Dr. Vivian Rambihar specializes in Internal Medicine and Cardiology in North York, Ontario.

Dr. Carol Strickland

Dr. Carol Strickland practices Family Medicine in Orillia, Ontario.

Community Service Award
Community Service Award
The Community Service Award is awarded for significant contribution to the health and welfare of the people of a local community as defined by involvement in community health and public welfare, including length of involvement, roles fulfilled in local organizations, and personal achievements.
Mr. Kieran Kennedy

Mr. Kieran Kennedy lives in Cornwall, Ontario.

Rev. William Sherwin

Rev. William Sherwin lives in Orillia, Ontario.

Section Service Award
Section Service Award
The Section Service Award is awarded in recognition of significant service to the OMA, medical profession, or public within a Section.
Dr. Roy Kirkpatrick

Dr. Roy Kirkpatrick lives in Huntsville, Ontario.

Medical Student Achievement Award
Medical Student Achievement Award
The Medical Student Achievement Award is awarded for significant contributions at the political
and/or community level that helps advance the life and/or education of all medical students.
Benjamin Cassidy

Benjamin Cassidy is beginning his fourth year at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM). Prior to medical school, he completed a BSc and MA in psychology as well as a neuroscience graduate diploma. Mr. Cassidy’s research focused on hippocampal electrophysiology and spatial memory formation in healthy individuals, as well as patient populations. He later managed an international fMRI study on cognitive aging. In medical school, he has contributed to concussion research and is currently working on a project investigating psychosis in MS. Mr. Cassidy has been involved with local, provincial and national projects and organizations focused on student and patient advocacy. At NOSM, he has represented students as class representative and then Vice-President External on numerous academic and administrative committees. Over the past two years, Mr. Cassidy has sat on the Ontario Medical Students Association (OMSA) Executive and served as an OMA Delegate. He founded the Northern Ontario and Rural Medicine Committee at OMSA, dedicated to improving medical learning as well as care provision in these settings. Mr. Cassidy also co-chaired the 2017 Ontario Medical Students’ Weekend in Sudbury, Ontario, and led a workshop on LGBT2-SQ+ Health. Nationally, Mr. Cassidy is a representative of the Canadian Federation of Medical Students and has been the Local Officer of Indigenous Health and Reproductive & Sexual Health. He is the founding co-chair of the Canadian Medical Learners for Gender and Sexual Diversity and serves as the National Officer of Reproductive and Sexual Health. In 2017, Mr. Cassidy was honoured with the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame Award for his leadership and advocacy work and remains dedicated to improving health care access for marginalized groups such as the LGBT2-SQ+, indigenous and elderly communities.

Brandon Chau

Brandon Chau is a graduating student from the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry. He is passionate about giving back to the medical community and has served in leadership positions locally as Vice-President External of the Hippocratic Council, provincially as an Executive member of the Ontario Medical Students Association, and nationally as the Interprofessional Education (IPE) lead for the Canadian Federation of Medical Students. As a passionate advocate for wellness, Mr. Chau co-pioneered a provincewide suicide intervention workshop for medical students, with the goal of breaking silences around suicide. Mr. Chau is passionate about medical education, having served multiple roles in curricular development, including helping to design and implement a new undergraduate medical course. While pursuing his residency in Emergency Medicine, Mr. Chau plans to apply knowledge gained from his lifeguarding experience into advancing simulation training for medical learners everywhere.

Brandon Tang

Brandon Tang is a fourth-year medical student at the University of Toronto, where he completed a Master of Science in System Leadership and Innovation concurrent to his medical studies. During medical school, Mr. Tang was highly involved in medical education, serving as a student advocate on several committees through his role as Vice-President of Education, leading the production of two novel smartphone apps to improve student life and education, serving as the Editor-in-Chief of an international clinical skills textbook, and playing an instrumental role in the first medical curriculum renewal at the University of Toronto in over 20 years. In addition, he volunteered for four years as a student leader of the Foundation for Student Science and Technology, a national not-for-profit organization which promotes high school and undergraduate student scholarship in science. Through his master’s degree, Mr. Tang has also been highly engaged in health systems strengthening, co-leading the development of a physician performance feedback tool for a major academic hospital, as well as spearheading an international research collaboration examining barriers to accessing cancer medicines in Trinidad and Tobago. His leadership endeavours have been recognized at the local, provincial, and national levels by organizations such as the Ontario Medical Students Association, Professional Association of Residents of Ontario, and Canadian Federation of Medical Students. Mr. Tang will be completing his residency in internal medicine at the University of British Columbia. Ultimately, he aspires to make a lasting impact on Canadian health care through a career as an internist, medical educator, and health systems leader.

Max Deschner

Max Deschner is a fourth-year medical student at the University of Ottawa. With a background in political science, he is interested in how health care policy can improve health equity. Early on in medical school, Mr. Deschner took part in advocacy work as a member of the Canadian Federation of Medical Students (CFMS) Committee on Health Policy. He helped guide the CFMS General Assembly to endorse policy positions in support of national pharmacare, culturally safe improvements to indigenous medical education, and team- based primary care. Mr. Deschner also served as the Vice-President of External Affairs on the Aesculapian Society, the University of Ottawa’s medical student governing body. In this role he represented the University of Ottawa to organizations including the Ontario Medical Students Association, Canadian Federation of Medical Students, Academy of Medicine Ottawa, and Ontario Medical Association. He is particularly proud to have worked alongside other student leaders to champion learner wellness and the need for a more robust health human resources strategy across Canada. More recently, Mr. Deschner has advocated on a personal level by writing opinion-editorials in Canadian media on important health care issues, including improving access to opioid replacement therapy among prisoners, helping patients navigate the traumas of adverse childhood experiences, and rolling out a basic income guarantee to improve food security and health outcomes in northern and indigenous communities. Following medical school, Mr. Deschner will be starting a residency in internal medicine at Western University. He looks forward to continuing leadership and advocacy work at the postgraduate level.

Sachin V. Pasricha

Sachin Pasricha is a second-year medical student at Queen’s University whose passion for medical education has enhanced the experience of his peers. As Clinical Skills representative, he liaises with faculty to voice the appreciations and concerns of students. Through this role, he saw an opportunity for students to work alongside faculty to convert paper-based resources into online interactive modules. Mr. Pasricha has also worked to make Queen’s University one of the first schools to allow patients to provide medical students with feedback on their communication skills, an initiative that he will present at the 2018 Canadian Conference on Medical Education. The success of this work led to his receiving both the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Student Research Fellowship and the Ontario Medical Students Association/ Associated Medical Services Compassionate Care Medical Student Education Research Grant. Recognizing the benefit of interdisciplinary learning, Mr. Pasricha collaborated with MBA students to launch Kingston’s Graduate Management Consulting Association, which now runs an eight-session mini-MBA series to provide graduate, professional, and undergraduate students with fundamental business skills. Outside Queen’s University, Mr. Pasricha is involved with various committees of the Canadian Federation of Medical Students (CFMS) and Ontario Medical Students Association (OMSA). As part of the CFMS, he has helped streamline the position paper process to encourage more engagement from stakeholder groups. With the OMSA, he established a platform for continuous and real-time program evaluation by employing Google analytics. Looking toward clerkship and beyond, Mr. Pasricha hopes to embark on a career where he can continue to actively engage with his passion for medical education.

Vivian Ng

Vivian Ng is a third-year medical student at McMaster University. She currently serves as the Co-Chair of the Ontario Medical Students Association (OMSA). In this role, she has been a student advocate on prominent issues including medical learner mental health, physician resources planning and professionalism within medical training. She previously served as the Vice-President of External Affairs for McMaster University. During her two terms, she represented McMaster at provincial and national organizations, including OMSA and the Canadian Federation of Medical Students (CFMS). Having a particular interest in medical student mental health, she organized the first provincewide suicide intervention workshop for medical students, assisted in organizing OMSA’s annual Wellness Retreat for two years, and advocated at the Canadian Medical Association General Meeting for increasing awareness around suicide in health care professionals. With a keen interest in governance, Ms. Ng spearheaded the initiative to reform the OMSA Election Policy, and this year co-authored the CFMS Strategic Plan. Ms. Ng will be graduating this spring and will be attending the University of Ottawa in July to start her residency in pediatrics. She aspires to continue her involvement in political advocacy as a resident, and is endlessly grateful to have met amazing colleagues from all over Canada through her experiences on OMSA and the CFMS.

Resident Achievement Award
Resident Achievement Award
The Resident Achievement Award is awarded for outstanding contribution to the advancement of post-graduate training.
Dr. Blair Bigham

Dr. Blair Bigham is a Hamilton-based multimedia journalist, scientist and resident emergency physician. His residency training is at McMaster University, and he was a Global Journalism Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. Dr. Bigham’s graduate work at St. Michael’s Hospital focused on knowledge translation and resuscitation science, and he currently studies sepsis in various settings. He works with both the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and American Heart Association promoting resuscitation care worldwide. His journalism work has appeared in the Toronto Star, the Globe and Mail, Maclean’s Magazine, and CBC’s The National, and his research has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine and the Canadian Medical Association Journal, among others. He frequently appears on CBC Radio to provide analysis and commentary on late- breaking health news. Dr. Bigham has worked in health care settings on five continents and has responded to emergencies in urban, rural, and remote settings on helicopters, boats, and vehicles that could generously be described as pick-up trucks. His current home-away-from-home is at the University of Namibia School of Medicine, where he focuses on training health care providers to respond to emergencies in limited-resource settings. Dr. Bigham witnesses the relationship between wealth and health on a daily basis, and reports on the under-told stories of patients, health care providers, and the systems that help or fail them.

Dr. Sophia Colantonio

Dr. Sophia Colantonio is a fourth-year resident in dermatology at the University of Ottawa. Born and raised in Ottawa, she completed her Bachelor of Science with Honours in Biology, as well as her Doctorate of Medicine, at the University of Ottawa. She received a Master of Public Health at Yale University. Throughout her residency Dr. Colantonio has been a motivated leader, mentor, and teacher. Dr. Colantonio is currently the Co-Chief Resident of Dermatology. She sits on numerous committees, including the Female Physician Leadership Committee at the Ottawa Hospital, the Dermatology Residency Selection Committee, the Dermatology Curriculum Committee, and the Dermatology Research and Mentorship Committee. Dr. Colantonio also served as a PARO general council representative for the University of Ottawa from 2015 to 2017. As a positive and engaged role model for medical students and other residents, Dr. Colantonio recently received the Peter MacLeod Ambassador Award from the Department of Medicine at the Ottawa Hospital. It is awarded to the resident who best embodies the CanMEDS roles. With a passion for teaching at the local level with medical students, residents, and staff in other disciplines, Dr. Colantonio co-developed the current curriculum. She is also a member of the Dermatology Postgraduate Curriculum Committee to establish a long-term curriculum that is focused on CanMEDS. Further, Dr. Colantonio is bilingual and has taught second- year medical students at the University of Ottawa in both French and English for the past three years on the subject of how to do full body skin exams. She also has an established publication record in peer–reviewed journals, with seven publications to date. After residency, Dr. Colantonio plans to have a diverse dermatology practice that includes teaching and research.

Dr. David Jerome

Dr. David Jerome is a second-year resident in Family Medicine at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM). He is training in the Rural Stream, and is based out of Sioux Lookout, Ontario. Dr. Jerome received his undergraduate degree in the History of Science and Technology from the University of King’s College in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He obtained an MSc in Neuroscience and his Medical Degree from Memorial University of Newfoundland. Dr. Jerome serves as the Vice Chair of the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) Section of Residents. In this role, he has chaired a group that examined how advanced care planning is taught to family medicine residents in Canada. As part of this project, the group developed two novel point-of-care tools for residents to use when performing advanced care planning in practice. Dr. Jerome also serves as Co-Chair of the Resident Committee of the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada (SRPC). In this role, he has worked with his co-chair to expand the membership of the resident committee five-fold, with representation from across the country. He has also chaired a group that is developing a national database of Category 1 Enhanced Skills programs for family medicine residents and practitioners considering advanced training. Dr. Jerome is a member of the Canadian Forces. After residency, he will serve as a General Duty Medical Officer on a Canadian Forces base.

Dr. Alexander Leung

Dr. Alexander Leung is a third-year resident in the Family-Emergency Medicine (CCFP-EM) program at Queen’s University. He completed his Medical Degree at the University of Toronto, and Family Medicine training at Queen’s University. Dr. Leung has active interests in the development of novel interventions to improve end-of-life care for homeless individuals, and emergency department operational efficiency. The practical outcomes of these projects on patient care were studied, and resulted in multiple publications, and numerous poster and podium presentations. For his research, Dr. Leung received 3rd place in the 2016 Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians Abstract Competition. Recently, he has been collaborating with physicians on projects to improve access to palliative care resources for vulnerably housed populations, and acute care services in Kingston. Currently, Dr. Leung is the Family Medicine PGY3 Enhanced Skills Chief. He previously served as a Family Medicine Kingston Site Co-Chief and Vice President of the Ontario Colleges of Family Physicians Resident Committee. Within these roles, Dr. Leung spearheaded initiatives to enhance the residency experience at Queen’s University. This included the Family Medicine Investing Club, Obstetrical and Newborn Care Elective, and Queen’s Family-Emergency Interview social. He also created a formal process to prospectively collect educational needs from incoming residents, and retrospectively gather end-of-year resident feedback. By working closely with faculty, this information has been used to drive and guide changes to the resident curriculum, scheduling and wellness. Upon residency completion, Dr. Leung hopes to work as an emergency physician, and continue contributing to his field outside the patient care setting through leadership and research involvement.

Dr. Daniel Luke Pepe

Dr. Daniel Luke Pepe was born and raised in London, Ontario, where he completed his undergraduate degree in Medical Sciences and Doctor of Medicine from the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry. After graduating medical school, Dr. Pepe began his residency in General Surgery at Western and later transferred into Family Medicine, where he is currently the PGY-3 Academic Fellow in Family Medicine. He lives in London with his wife, Dr. Cassandra Lin-Pepe, and is currently starting community family practice with her. Dr. Pepe has a passion for both medical education and patient education. In General Surgery, he was the recipient of the prestigious Murray Girotti Resident Teaching Award, which was awarded to the top resident teacher in the Department of Surgery at Western. He has also won numerous teaching awards, including the Meds ‘49 Resident Teaching Awards as best junior resident teacher and the 2018 PARO Resident Trust Fund Teaching Award for Western University. Dr. Pepe has been involved in developing curriculum for the Transition to Residency (T2R) lecture series at Western. As well, he is currently pursuing his Master of Clinical Science in Family Medicine through the Department of Family Medicine at Western. He was awarded the 2017 Patient Education Grant from the College of Family Physicians of Canada to fund his open access educational resource for patients, Teach & Learn Family Medicine. His patient education resources from this project are currently being delivered to patients as part of the Patient Oriented Discharge Summary Project at University Hospital in London, Ontario. Dr. Pepe and his wife have also recently been awarded a grant to study a novel approach to competency-based medical education in family medicine as part of a grant from the postgraduate department at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry.

Dr. Ahmed Taher

Dr. Ahmed Taher is a fourth-year emergency medicine resident from the University of Toronto, where he also completed his medical degree. During medical school, Dr. Taher served as the medical society president and was nominated as valedictorian for his graduating class. Throughout residency, he served as a Chief Resident for his program and was elected President of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Resident Section. During his tenure, Dr. Taher led two national working groups: one created the first enhanced competency directory for Canadian FRCP emergency residents; the other focused on resident wellness, which involved co-ordinating an inaugural North American annual wellness week, a published CAEP position statement on resident wellness, and completion of a study that gathered information on emergency resident wellness in Canada. Dr. Taher’s scholarly activities have focused on pre-hospital CPR quality data abstraction, and more recently an innovative educational program to expand the role of paramedics in Ontario. He is currently completing a Masters of Public Health degree for his fellowship year at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. His two areas of focus are health informatics as well as quality improvement and patient safety. Dr. Taher has utilized this training to explore the role of health informatics in a population level continuous quality improvement program – the Emergency Department Return Visit Quality Program in Ontario. He hopes to advance the use of health information technology to improve the quality of patient care and patient safety in Canada and beyond.

OMA Life Membership
OMA Life Membership
OMA Life Membership is awarded to those members who have made an outstanding contribution to the work of the Association in the interest of the medical profession. In addition to OMA-related involvement, work done to advance medical science and other positive work done at the provincial level can be considered.
Dr. Allan Abramovitch

Dr. Allan Abramovitch graduated from McGill University, Faculty of Medicine in 1976. Following a rotating internship in Toronto, he worked in general practice in Cayuga, Ontario, from 1977 to 1978. He completed a urology residency at the University of Toronto in 1984 and a Fellowship in Male Infertility at the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas in 1985. Dr. Abramovitch has had a general urology practice in Scarborough, Ontario, specializing in male infertility, has been a consultant at several in vitro fertilization centres in the Toronto area, and has been on active staff at the Scarborough Grace and Scarborough Hospitals, from 1986 until the present. He served as Chief of Surgery at the Birchmount site of the Scarborough Hospital from 1999 to 2009. Dr. Abramovitch has been a member of the Executive of the OMA Section on Urology intermittently from 1993 until the present in various capacities, including Section Chair from 1995 to 1998, and two terms as Tariff Chair. He has represented Ontario urologists in providing input to the Inter-Provincial Socio- Economic and Manpower Committee of the Canadian Urology Association from 1996 to 1999, and in providing submissions to the OMA Central Tariff Committee, and to several OMA Inter-Sectional Relative Value Committees from 1996 to 2010. Dr. Abramovitch has been instrumental in applying the information gained from working on these Relative Value Committees to modernize the OHIP fee schedule for Ontario urologists.

Dr. David Berbrayer

Dr. David Berbrayer is a specialist in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Physiatry), certified by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the American Board of Medical Specialties. He is presently Medical Director, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto. Dr. Berbrayer is also a consultant at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital and the Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto. Dr. Berbrayer is past Vice-President and Chief of Staff at Lyndhurst – the Spinal Cord Centre. He is past Chairman, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ontario Medical Association (for 25 years), and presently elected delegate of OMA District 11, zone 2. Dr. Berbrayer has completed the Master Teacher program at the University of Toronto, as well as the Harvard Macy Scholar Program. He has completed a Physician Leadership Program in HPME, Administration, Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto. He has contributed to many University search committees, residency training committees, including development of new University/Royal College programs. Dr. Berbrayer has won numerous awards presented at the University of Toronto, Ontario Medical Association, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Cleveland Clinic, American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, Canadian Association of Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus, Division of Physiatry at University of Toronto, Lifetime Achievement Award at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Service Award Hospital for Sick Children and Leadership Award Department of Medicine Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. Dr. Berbrayer has also received numerous teaching awards locally, nationally and internationally.

Dr. Christopher Blount

Dr. Christopher Blount is a University of Toronto graduate (class of 1977) who began his general practice in 1980 in New Liskeard, Ontario. He has enjoyed working in a small community for 38 years and is still going strong. Although providing anesthesiology services is his major commitment, he has also enjoyed a full range of medical practice including obstetrics, minor surgery, coroner’s investigations, palliative care and psychiatry. Dr. Blount married the night nursing supervisor of the Temiskaming Hospital in 1982 and together they had four children, all now grown, educated, and living across Canada. After the children left home there was time to learn French and to dabble in Arabic and Russian. He is an avid reader of detective stories and sometimes plays the piano. When he gets away to the city, Dr. Blount enjoys art galleries and opera performances.

Dr. Charles Nicholas Catton

Dr. Charles Catton graduated from the University of Ottawa Medical School in 1976, and completed his Internal Medicine training, followed by Radiation Oncology training in 1983 at the University of Toronto. He subsequently completed a Fellowship in GU Oncology at the Royal Marsden Hospital in the United Kingdom, and in 1985 took up practice in academic Radiation Oncology in Hamilton, Ontario. He returned to the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in 1988, where he remains on staff as a Professor of Radiation Oncology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Catton represented Ontario Radiation Oncologists from 2005-2008 as Chair of the Ontario Association of Radiation Oncologists, and Chair of the OMA Radiation Oncology section. In this capacity, he led negotiations with Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that resulted in a contract to improve the terms of the existing Physicians Services Agreement. Dr. Catton has worked with Cancer Care Ontario since 2009 to improve the care of Ontario patients with sarcomas, a rare and complex malignancy. First as Chair of the provincial Expert Panel, and then as Chair of the Sarcoma Services Oversight Committee, he helped to raise awareness about sarcomas, develop sarcoma care pathways and management guidelines, and establish regional Centres of Excellence for these patients. In his academic role, Dr. Catton led an international clinical trial of radiotherapy for prostate cancer that changed the standard of care for men receiving radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. He continues to teach locally and lecture nationally and internationally about prostate cancer and sarcoma.

Dr. Charles Douglas Crawford

Dr. Charles Douglas Crawford graduated from the University of Toronto in 1981 and received fellowship in the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in 1986. After a fellowship in Critical Care Medicine at Toronto Western Hospital, he practised anesthesiology and critical care in Barrie and Orillia for six years, becoming full time at Royal Victoria Hospital (RVH) in 1993. Dr. Crawford was the Chief of the Department of Anesthesiology of Royal Victoria Hospital twice, and is now the department treasurer. He was the Clinical Director of the RVH Surgical Program from 2005 to 2006. Dr. Crawford became a member of the Executive of the Section on Anesthesiology, rising to the role of Section Chair in 1997-1998, and then Section Tariff Chair from 1998 to 2003. He worked with the Executive during these years to improve the practice conditions for Ontario anesthesiologists. He was a member of the Canadian Anesthesiologist Society’s Working Group on the Environment from 1988 to 1991, when their report was presented along with newsletters to the membership. He sat on the Canadian Anesthesiologist Society Governing Council from 1990 to 1997 and participated in several committees with this organization. In 2014, Dr. Crawford was elected President of Simcoe County Medical Society, a position he still holds today. He has been a delegate to Council, related to the Simcoe County Medical Society, since 2013.

Dr. Jonathan Frederic Dreyer

Dr. Jonathan Dreyer is a graduate of McGill University, BSC 1972, MD CM 1977, and the Johns Hopkins Emergency Medicine residency in 1982. He has been a member of the Western University Faculty of Medicine since 1984, and full Professor since 2001. Dr. Dreyer’s career has been varied – its focus being on pre-hospital care, emergency department management and health services research. As first Medical Director of the London Base Hospital for Prehospital care from 1987 to 2008, Dr. Dreyer helped lead the introduction of Advanced Care Paramedics across Ontario. He was Chief of Emergency Medicine at Victoria Hospital and the London Health Sciences Centre from 1988 to 2001, and took a leading role in the introduction of a Clinical Academic Practice Plan at Western from 2000 to 2005. Dr. Dreyer was a member of the OMA Section on Emergency Medicine from 1988 to 2007, and Chair from 2001-2004. He was a member of committees on RBRVS and the RVIC processes and was a member of the OMA/Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Emergency Department Working Group, which implemented the Emergency Department Alternate Funding Arrangement using data from a physician workload study, which he authored (POWER, CJEM 2009). Currently, Dr. Dreyer is Director of Research for the Division of Emergency Medicine at Western University, where he has co-authored over 40 peer reviewed publications. He has been Chief of Staff at Four Counties Health Services in Newbury since 2002, and was the Emergency Department Lead for the South West LHIN from 2011 to 2016. Dr. Dreyer continues to practice both academic and rural emergency medicine, and is an independent consultant on standards of care.

Dr. Deborah Hellyer

Dr. Deborah Hellyer, MD, FRCP(C), FCCP, CBOM, completed HBSc microbiology, UWO medical degree, rotating internship at St. Michael’s Toronto, and Internal/Respiratory Medicine at UWO. She moved to Windsor, Ontario, in 1984. Dr. Hellyer worked as an intensivist and respirologist for six years and then transferred to general respirology and occupational disease management. She continued hospital consultations and respiratory care unit coverage, and was medical director of the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Centre and Adjunct Professor at Schulich School of Medicine. She is currently located at Hotel-Dieu Grace Healthcare, practices including hospital consults, office practice, and Occupational Health Clinic. Dr. Hellyer was President of the Essex County Medical Society and was involved in the initial development of the satellite medical school and clinical education day development. She was on the Ontario Medical Association Board of Directors for 11 years, Co-Chair development of the Physician Assistants Program, Chair Bilateral Physician Human Resources, Negotiations Committee, health policy and removal of the government medical audit. She was previously on the Canadian Medical Association Board of Directors for six years, including Canadian physician human resources, policy and committee development. Presently, Dr. Hellyer is on the CPSO Council, Quality Assurance and Disciplinary Committees. She received awards from the Ontario Lung Association, Ontario Medical Association (Distinguished Service 2014), American Association of Physician Assistants, and Canadian Association of Physician Assistants. Dr. Hellyer has two wonderful adult children—Gregory and Jennifer—and husband Chris, who have supported her through her life experiences. Areas of interest include ongoing education, travel, exercise and English bulldogs (Bentley).

Dr. Catherine Kelly

Dr. Catherine Kelly completed her medical training at McGill University in 1980 and obtained specialty training in internal medicine and endocrinology in 1986. She moved to Toronto in 1991 and joined the staff at Women’s College Hospital. Dr. Kelly became the Endocrinology Postgraduate Program Director at the University of Toronto in 1999 until 2007. She became the WCH Site Director of the Peters Boyd Academy of the Faculty of Medicine and Academy Director. She was Division Director of Endocrinology at WCH from 1999 to 2003 and again from 2006 to 2014. Dr. Kelly is a Clinician Educator in the Faculty of Medicine and has won numerous teaching awards. She is a Professor of Medicine at University of Toronto. From 2001 to 2003, Dr. Kelly served as Vice-President and then President of the Medical Dental Midwifery Staff at Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Sciences Centre. She was the OMA representative for the WCH branch during this time. Dr. Kelly was President of the MDMSA of WCH from 2012 to 2014, and was the WCH Branch Society representative to the OMA at that time.

Dr. Sidney H. Kennedy

Dr. Sidney Kennedy is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto, the Arthur Sommer Rotenberg Chair in Suicide and Depression Studies at St. Michael’s Hospital, and a Scientist at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Krembil Research Institute. He is the Principal Investigator for the Canadian Biomarker Integration Network in Depression. Dr. Kennedy has devoted his career over the past three decades to advancing medical science in the care of people with depression through advocacy, education, clinical research, knowledge translation and clinical care of patients. He was President of the International Society for Affective Disorders (2010-2014) and continues to serve as the immediate Past President. He was also President of the Canadian College of Neuropsychopharmacology (2002-2004), and is an elected member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. Dr. Kennedy is a Distinguished Fellow of the Canadian Psychiatric Association (2012) and the American Psychiatric Association (2005), and a member of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology and the Royal College of Psychiatry (United Kingdom). He is the author of over 400 peer reviewed publications and 11 books related to mood disorders. His contributions in Ontario and throughout Canada have been recognized by his induction as a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences in 2016, and as recipient of the Douglas Utting Award in 2017 for promoting awareness, understanding and advancement of treatment for depression and suicide.

Dr. Sheilah B. Lamb

Dr. Sheilah Lamb graduated from McMaster University Medical School in 1980. She completed her Family Medicine Residency in 1982, and subsequently joined the Faculty in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University. During this time, Dr. Lamb was Assistant CME Director at McMaster University. She was part of the Physician Review and Enhancement Program as an assessor and remediation facilitator. Dr. Lamb has been an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Family Medicine from July 1, 2003, until present. She was part of the early Practice Based Small Group Learning Program, not only as a group facilitator but also leading the national Facilitator Training program. Dr. Lamb joined the Hamilton Academy of Medicine Executive Committee in 2010 and became President of the Academy in 2014. She has been involved in teaching at the DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, in Professional Competencies, and continues to be active in her family practice in Hamilton, Ontario, where she is part of the Hamilton Family Health Team.

Dr. Rolland Michael Leader

Dr. Rolland Michael Leader graduated from the University of Toronto School of Medicine in 1976. He volunteered as attending physician at Holberton Hospital, Antigua, West Indies, in 1979. He completed his training and received his Fellowship in Internal Medicine from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in 1981. Dr. Leader established a consultant internal medicine practice in Ajax, Ontario, and joined the medical staff at Ajax and Pickering Hospital in 1981. He was visiting medical consultant to the forensic unit at the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry from 1981 to 1984. Dr. Leader was instrumental in developing advanced treatment protocols and served as Medical Director of the Intensive Care Unit for many years. As Chief of the Department of Medicine, he was a member of the Medical Advisory Committee. In 1985, he completed training in echocardiography and developed a new program at the hospital. In 1992, Dr. Leader initiated a hospital-based and outpatient cardiovascular clinical trial program, and was principal investigator in more than 40 studies in the following years. He was Chair of the OMA Section on Internal Medicine from 1992 to 1997, Medical Advisor, Heart and Stroke Foundation from 1992 to 1998, and a member of the expert cardiac panel of the Durham Region Service Review Steering Group. Following the merger with Scarborough Centenary Hospital, Dr. Leader joined the Cardiac Care Program in 1997 and was appointed Medical Director of the cardiac diagnostics laboratory. He fulfilled several advisory roles at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, including Peer Review Assessor from 1993 to 2013. Dr. Leader functioned as an active consultant in the Cardiac Program and Department of Medicine until 2013. He is currently involved in part-time community cardiology office practice, and continues to be involved in the non-invasive cardiac diagnostics lab and cardiology rapid referral clinic at Lakeridge Health Ajax and Pickering Hospital.

Dr. Garnet James Maley

Dr. Garnet Maley obtained his MD from the University of Toronto in 1982. He started his family practice in Milton, Ontario, in 1985, and is a widely respected local physician leader. Dr. Maley has held many responsible positions at the Ontario Medical Association and is a Past President of the Halton County Medical Society. He was a member of OMA Council, representing District 4 and the Family Practice Assembly for many years. Dr. Maley joined the OMA Board of Directors in 1999, and during that time was a member of the Negotiating Committee and the Physician Services Committee. He was a leader in primary care reform and helped in the design of the Family Health Group model and the Family Health Network model. Under Dr. Maley’s leadership, the primary care landscape was dramatically improved for patients and physicians. Dr. Maley took a deep interest in the affairs of medical students and was Chair of the OMA Student Bursary Fund. He was instrumental in establishing a Named Student Bursary from the physicians of District 4.

Dr. Norman Muirhead

Dr. Norman Muirhead graduated MB ChB at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1976, proceeding MD in 1983. He trained in internal medicine and nephrology at the University of Aberdeen Teaching Hospitals from 1976 to 1981, and at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne from 1981 to 1983. During this period Dr. Muirhead completed his research training in nephrology, and in 1983 moved to Canada to take up an academic position at the University of Western Ontario. Dr. Muirhead served as Head of the OMA Section on Nephrology from 1990 to 1991 and was a member of the OMA Committee on Economics from 1991 to 1996, serving as Chair from 1994 to 1996. He is currently Professor of Medicine at Western University and a staff nephrologist at London Health Sciences Centre. He served as Chief of Nephrology at University Hospital London from 1995 to 2004. He is currently Associate Chair of the Department of Medicine at Western University, and serves as Chair of the Department’s Financial Management Committee. Dr. Muirhead serves as Regional Medical Lead for Southwestern Ontario within the Ontario Renal Network (ORN) and is engaged in a number of ORN initiatives aimed at enhancing and improving care of patients with renal disease across Ontario. Dr. Muirhead has provided in-person community outreach follow-up clinics for renal transplant patients in Northern Ontario for more than 30 years. He has been involved with the Kidney Foundation of Canada as a volunteer for 30 years, and has served on the Board of the Southwestern Ontario Chapter of the Kidney Foundation since 2010 and is currently Chapter President.

Dr. Brendan Mullen

Dr. Brendan John Mullen graduated from the University of Ottawa medical school in 1977. He completed his anatomical pathology training at the University of Toronto in 1982, and an MRC Research Fellowship at the University of British Columbia Pulmonary Research Laboratory in 1984. Dr. Mullen began his anatomical pathology practice in Toronto, and is on active staff at Mount Sinai Hospital where he is the Deputy Director, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. At Mount Sinai Hospital, Dr. Mullen developed the Andrology Laboratory – the largest laboratory in Canada focused solely on the clinical investigation of male infertility. The laboratory provides diagnostic and research services in support of the Murray Koffler Urologic Wellness Centre and the Reproductive Biology Unit at Mount Sinai Hospital. The laboratory also provides specialized laboratory diagnostic services to many Canadian infertility clinics. Realizing the limitation of the hospital sector in providing advanced diagnostics to community patients, Dr. Mullen developed FlowLabs, a community laboratory focused on the investigation of male infertility. Dr. Mullen is currently a member of the OMA Relativity Review Committee. He has served in a variety of capacities with the OMA Section on Laboratory Medicine Executive (including a term as Chair), and the Ontario Association of Pathologists Executive, for which he received the Ontario Association of Pathologists Service Award. Dr. Mullen has been a member of a number of OMA-Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care bilateral committees related to laboratory medicine. He recently served as a consultant to the Newfoundland Commission of Inquiry on Hormone Receptor Testing, and the Nova Scotia Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Best Practice Initiative.

Steven Nadler M.D.

Dr. Steven Nadler obtained a mathematics degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a medical degree from McGill University. He completed clinical training at McGill in internal medicine and nephrology, and a basic science research fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital at Harvard. Dr. Nadler joined the Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, at the University of Ottawa in 1986. Initially, he held peer-reviewed grant support for basic laboratory studies of renal tubule physiology. He taught and also led curriculum development related to pre-clinical renal education, and chaired the Canadian Society of Nephrology Education Committee, steering its development of “approved” educational programs for members during the earlier years of the Royal College’s Continuing Professional Development programs for specialists. Clinically, Dr. Nadler’s activities focused on hemodialysis. He was Director of Hemodialysis at the Ottawa Hospital during the hospitals’ merger, and at a time of expansion of the program to outlying communities. He served on the Executive of the Ontario Association of Nephrologists/OMA Section of Nephrology, and has chaired the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario Task Force responsible for establishing clinical practice parameters for Hemodialysis Independent Health Facilities. As his clinical career wound down, Dr. Nadler was a member of a cohort of Faculty Distinguished Teachers, allowing him to expand his teaching repertoire in various areas and approaches, in both the English and French language programs. He has been a physician champion for use of electronic medical records for his division, and now works with the Ottawa Hospital as it implements a fully integrated multi-hospital electronic health record system.

Dr. Terrence Owen O’Brien

Dr. Terrence Owen O’Brien (MD University of Calgary 1978, CCFP University of Calgary 1980, FRCP(C) Emergency Medicine Queen’s University 1989) is currently Assistant Professor, Queen’s University Department of Emergency Medicine, and Medical Director Emergency Department, Kingston Health Sciences Centre. He is Past Executive of the OMA Section on Emergency Medicine, and Residency Director of Queen’s RCPSC Emergency Medicine Residency Program (1996-2016). Dr. O’Brien was on the Examination Board, RCPSC Emergency Medicine, from 1996 to 2001, and is starting a second term in 2018.

Dr. Carrol Pitters

Dr. Carrol Pitters graduated from the Faculty of Medicine of the University of the West Indies in 1979. She completed her paediatric training at the University of Ottawa and joined the staff of the Emergency Department at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in 1985. She was appointed Associate Director of the Emergency Department in 1992, then Medical Director and Chief of Emergency Medicine from 1996 to 2006. She is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Paediatrics and Emergency Medicine, and continues in her clinical role as an ED staff physician. From 2010 to 2016, Dr. Pitters was Chief of Staff and Chief Medical Officer at CHEO. She has also chaired the Governance Board of the Children’s Hospital Academic Medical Organization since 2007. Dr. Pitters was a member of the Practice and Education Committee of the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario from 2010 to 2016, serving as co-chair from 2010 to 2012. She has served on a number of provincial advisory expert panels developing health care and performance indicators for emergency medicine. Dr. Pitters was a member of the Executive of the OMA Section on Emergency Medicine from 2000 to 2008, serving as Vice Chair from 2001 to 2004, then Chair until 2007. During this time, the Executive negotiated, among other things, an alternate funding agreement for emergency departments, as well as on-call funding for emergency medicine physicians. She was a member of the OMA Executive of the Academic Medicine Forum from May 2014 to December 2015. Dr. Pitters became a Canadian Certified Physician Executive in 2014.

Dr. Robin Richards

Dr. Robin Richards was born in Guelph, Ontario, and attended McMaster University, where he obtained BA (Geography - 1973) and MD (1976) degrees. He completed the University of Toronto Postgraduate Training Program in Orthopaedic Surgery and received his FRCSC in 1982. Dr. Richards was a Fellow at Duke University in 1983, and joined the staff of St. Michael’s Hospital in 1984, where he was Head of the Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical Director of the Mobility Program, Chair of the Medical Advisory Committee, and served on the Board. Dr. Richards was Head of the Department of Surgery and Co-Director of the Operating Room and Related Services at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre from 2001-2012. Dr. Richards maintains an active surgical practice focusing on arthroplasty of the shoulder and elbow, upper extremity reconstruction following trauma, soft tissue procedures to control joint instabilities in the upper extremity, and the surgical treatment of irreparable brachial plexus injury. Dr. Richards is Vice Chair - Clinical of the University of Toronto Department of Surgery, Chair of the Awards and Internal Evaluation Committees, Medical Director of the Sunnybrook Working Condition Program and Sunnybrook Centre for Independent Living, a Deputy Editor of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery and Co-Editor of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Open Access. He is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Association, Past Secretary-Treasurer of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons and Past-President of the Ontario and Canadian Orthopaedic Associations. Dr. Richards enjoys stream fishing, cycling and wind-surfing. He has four children and three grandchildren.

Dr. Daniel Gerald Riegert

After graduating from University of Toronto in 1976, Dr. Daniel Gerald Riegert intended to become a family doctor in a small, remote community. After completing a rotating internship at North York General Hospital, Dr. Riegert completed a six-month GP anesthesia residency at Toronto East General Hospital, and six months of residency training in obstetrics at Grace Hospital, St. John’s, Newfoundland. He then returned to Toronto, where held a variety of short-term jobs for the next two years. During that time, he came to the understanding that a small town practice in a remote location was not what he was suited for. In 1980, Dr. Riegert established a solo family practice in Pickering. The following year, he began to practise anesthesia at Ajax-Pickering General Hospital, and became one of the three GP anesthetists at the hospital from 1982 to 1987. While there, he started an obstetrical epidural service. In 1987, Dr. Riegert sold his practice and entered an anesthesia residency at the University of Toronto. Upon completion of his training at the end of 1990, he did a one-year clinical fellowship at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, then joined the staff at Women’s College Hospital. After a brief sojourn back at Ajax-Pickering General Hospital in early 1996, Dr. Riegert joined the staff at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, where continues to be on active staff in the Department of Anesthesia three days a week. Dr. Riegert is blessed with three (married) children, and five grandchildren.

Dr. Paul Salciccioli

Dr. Paul Salciccioli was born and raised in Hamilton, Ontario. He graduated from the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine in 1977, and subsequently completed his family medicine residency in 1979 at the Wellesley Hospital, successfully obtaining his CCFP. Thereafter, Dr. Salciccioli commenced a comprehensive care family practice in Brampton, inclusive of his duties as an emergency room physician. Fellowship status (FCFP) was subsequently achieved in 2005. Dr. Salciccioli has been on Active Staff at the William Osler Health Centre in Brampton (previously Peel Memorial) and subsequently Courtesy Staff. He has a profound interest in undergraduate medical education and assisting fellow physicians on behalf of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario. He holds the academic rank of Adjunct Clinical Lecturer in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto. In that capacity, he has acted as a clinical supervisor and preceptor for undergraduate medical students. Dr. Salciccioli has served on the Admissions Committee for the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto and has acted on behalf of the Canadian Resident Matching Service for considered admissions to the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto. He is a National Examiner for the Medical Council of Canada, in addition to being an Examiner and Co-ordinator of the College of Family Physicians national qualifying exams. Dr. Salciccioli undertook responsibilities with the North Peel Medical Society over a period of many years, transitioning through various executive roles, inclusive of Member-at-Large, Secretary-Treasurer and, subsequently, President. He continues with his private practice in family medicine in Brampton, Ontario.

Dr. Rajni Saraf

Dr. Rajni Saraf was born in India, where she studied medicine and then went on to obtain MRCOG in the United Kingdom. Subsequently, she worked in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, for over four years. The final of the four continent move was to Canada, where Dr. Saraf again completed FRCSC in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1995. Since then she has been actively involved clinically, in teaching medical students and residents. After completing residency at Dalhousie University, she worked as an Ob/Gyn in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, and then in Sarnia, Ontario, from 2003. Dr. Saraf has held numerous positions as Executive member of the Lambton Branch of the OMA, has served as Delegate for District 1, and has been elected Alternate Delegate in the last two years for District 1, as well as for the OMA Section on Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Saraf enjoys her role as a Peer Assessor for the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, a position she has held for the last six years. Another of her cherished roles is teaching as Adjunct Professor at Western University, sitting at interviews for the selection of future medical students, and being an examiner for LMCC exams. Outside of medicine, Dr. Saraf is a Rotarian and sits on the Board of Directors for Pathways for Disabled Children. She tries to do public forms (DOES SHE MEAN “FORUMS”?) in her community to increase awareness about emerging issues such as Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID).

Dr. Doug Weir

Dr. Doug Weir graduated from the University of Calgary medical school in 1977 and completed residency in general psychiatry at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston in 1981. He completed two years of training at the Hospital for Sick Children in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. In 1982, Dr. Weir received his specialist RCPSC certificate in psychiatry, and his specialist certificate in child and adolescent psychiatry in 2014. He completed training at the Toronto Institute of Psychoanalysis in 1990. Dr. Weir has been active in the Ontario Medical Association since 1988. He was a Delegate to Council from 1988 to 2014, and President, Eglinton Medical Branch Society, from 1990 to 1994. He served on the OMA Section on Psychiatry Executive for several years, serving as Tariff Chair and Chair. Dr. Weir was on the 2004 and 2008 OMA negotiations teams. He served on the OMA Board of Directors from May 2005 to April 2014, and was President of the OMA in 2012-2013. He was active in the Canadian Medical Association as a Delegate to CMA Council (2005-2016), and also served on the Audit Committee (2009-2013) and the Health Care Transformation Working Group (2014-2015). Dr. Weir was honoured with the Jane Chamberlin Award from the Association of General Hospital Psychiatric Services. He received the President’s Commendation from the Canadian Psychiatric Association in 2009. In June 2012, Dr. Weir completed the OMA Physician Leadership Development Program. In the spring of 2014, he was one of the founders of the Ontario Working Group on Mental Health and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder. In October 2016, he joined the Board of the Toronto Psychoanalytic Society as Vice-President. Dr. Weir has been practising psychiatry in Toronto for over 35 years, and currently maintains a busy solo practice in psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry and psychoanalysis in Toronto.

Dr. Bill Wynveen

Dr. Bill Wynveen graduated from the University of Western Ontario in 1977. After completing his postgraduate training at Western, he started practising family medicine in the rural town of Simcoe, Ontario. In addition to running a busy family practice, Dr. Wynveen also provided obstetrical services to the community for over 30 years and worked in the emergency department. He continues to provide inpatient care and also nursing home coverage. He has served on virtually every hospital committee and held the position of President of the Medical Staff and also President of the Norfolk County Medical Society. In that capacity, he also served as an OMA Delegate for four years. Dr. Wynveen is very involved in education and serves as a preceptor for both McMaster University medical students and for the Rural Ontario Medical Program. He is also a frequent speaker for peer education locally. Dr. Wynveen has been the plant physician for the Imperial Oil Nanticoke refinery since 1980. Two of his four children were inspired to enter the medical field as nurses, the youngest of which is now in her final year of medical school. She hopes to join her father in family practice in the future.

TC Routley Challenge Shield
TC Routley Challenge Shield
The TC Routley Challenge Shield is awarded to the branch society which most adequately fulfils its purpose of service to its members, community and profession through programs and activities defined by:

a. contributions by branch societies to the OMA as demonstrated by activity in OMA Committees, Council and/or
b. contributions by the branch society to science, medical education, culture, hospitals, community service, politics, public welfare and other civic activities